List of topics
  • flight manipulator technologies
  • robotic servicing end-effector and tools
  • underwater & neutral buoyancy simulation
  • relative navigation and sensor systems for satellite capture
  • ground and microgravity servicing tasks experiments
  • satellite servicing technology development
  • autonomous rendezvous and docking
  • supervisory and autonomous control


Sponsored by:

IEEE RAS

Space Robotics TC

IEEE RAS

Teleorobotics TC

IEEE RAS

Service Robots TC

IEEE RAS

Marine Robotics TC

When & Where

Monday, May 14, 2012
St. Paul, Minnesota, USA.

Organizers

Craig Carignan
Assoc. Research Faculty Aerospace Engineering
University of Maryland
NASA/GSFC, Code 408 SSCO
College Park, MD 20742
+1 (301) 405-1996

Giacomo Marani
West Virginia University RC
WVRTC - NASA SSCO
1000 Galliher Dr.
26554 Fairmont, WV
+1 (304) 333-6071

Wendell Chun
Wendell H. Chun
University of Denver
Denver, CO 80126

Description

As satellites and spacecraft near the end of their expected lifetime, many begin to incur failures in key components, expend their attitude control fuel, or reach computer obsolescence. Moreover, many satellites suffer post-launch mishaps, including failed deployment of solar arrays and antennae and electronic failures of critical components that lead to mission failure. A free-flying spacecraft with an integral robotic front-end capable of reaching satellites in geosynchronous orbit would provide a valuable asset in addressing these failures. Satellite servicing could take advantage of recent advances in mobile manipulation in order to dock or "berth" to the target vehicle. After the servicer is docked, the robot can perform servicing tasks with a manipulator or make necessary repairs in-situ. For example, the servicer would be able to perform visual inspection, replace failed components, deploy stuck solar arrays, refuel tanks with liquid propellant, and perform many other maintenance tasks to support a single satellite or a constellation of satellites. The proposed full-day workshop will bring together international researchers in the fields of space and servicing robotics to exchange ideas in key enabling technology areas: manipulation, contact dynamics, pose estimation, teleoperation and haptics, shared autonomy, compliant control, multi-manipulator systems, time-delay compensation, and interactions in a space environment.


Goals & Objectives

The purpose of this full-day workshop is to bring together the top researchers in space robotics and satellite servicing to share work/ideas in an effort to field such a system in the near future, both as a national project or an international collaboration. A desired outcome is to gain consensus on the current state-of-the-art in servicing manipulation, and to identify gaps in existing research in order to mature the technology. The long-term goal is create a path forward for satellite servicing utilizing lessons learned from remotely operated vehicles currently deployed in land, sea, and air applications.

Workshop's Audience

The primary audience is constituted by robotics researchers, from both academy and industry, mainly working in the fields of space robotics, manipulator performance, modeling, arm dynamics and control, and migrating from telerobotics to autonomy. Industry members possibly interested in the exploitation of research results represent the secondary audience, together with any other robotic researcher interested in applications in mobile manipulation, pose estimation, rendezvous and docking sensors, dynamic manipulation, and universal end effectors.

 

Program and Schedule

The workshop will take place on Monday, May 14, 2012, during ICRA 2012 in St. Paul, Minnesota,
at The RiverCentre Convention Center.


Time Speaker Institution Title Presentation
 
Session 1: TECHNICAL COMMITTEE OUTLOOK ON ROBOTIC SERVICING

08:30 Craig Carignan University of Maryland Introduction to Robotic Satellite Servicing
08:40 Jordi Artigas Esclusa DLR - German Aerospace Center Telerobotics enabling On-Orbit Servicing – A DLR perspective
09:00 Giacomo Marani West Virginia University RC Advances in Autonomous Underwater Intervention
09:20 Kazuya Yoshida Tohoku University Space Robotics TC Perspective
09:40 Panel Discussion
   
10:00 Coffee Break
 
Session 2: AUTONOMOUS RENDEZVOUS AND DOCKING (AR&D)

10:30 John Ringelberg Lockheed Martin Supervisory Control Tool for AR&D
10:50 Kevin Miller Ball Aerospace AR&D and RNS for Robotic Servicing
11:10 Alvar Saenz-Otero Massachusetts Institute of Technology Maturation of AR&D algorithms with SPHERES
 
11:50 Lunch Break
 
Session 3: SERVICING ENVIRONMENT AND SERVICING SYSTEMS

13:30 David L. Akin University of Maryland Simulation of On-Orbit Servicing Tasks in Neutral Buoyancy
13:50 Mitsushige Oda Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency ETS-VII Follow-on Activities
14:10 Brian Roberts NASA GSFC Robotics Servicing Challenges
14:30 Glen Henshaw Naval Research Laboratory Overview of the DARPA Phoenix Mission
         
Session 4: ROBOTIC MANIPULATION

14:50 Peter Kazanzides Johns Hopkins University Teleoperation with Time Delay
15:10 Roberto Lampariello Robotic and Mechatronic Center (DLR) Towards semi-autonomous grasping of a non-cooperative target
15:30 Sean Dougherty MDA The FREND Robotic Arm
         
15:50 Coffee break      
 
16:30 Nicolaus Radford NASA JSC Robonaut 2 Status
16:50 Closing Panel & Remarks Speakers TBD Future Direction for Robotic Satellite Servicing
       
17:30 WORKSHOP CLOSED    


Craig Carignan


Contact:
University of Maryland
NASA SSCO
College Park, MD 20742
+1 (301) 405-1996

Biography:
Craig Carignan received his PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 1987. During his career, he has served as a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Maryland Space Systems Laboratory, and Georgetown University Medical Center. While at Georgetown University, he led a project to build a powered arm exoskeleton for rehabilitation applications. He has authored over 60 publications in robotics and has taught over 10 courses on robotics and control topics. He served as an undergraduate academic advisor as well as a faculty advisor for a fraternity for which he received two awards. Dr. Carignan has also served on various NSF review committees for the Biomedical Engineering and Research to Aid Disabilities Program. He recently completed a mobility assignment with the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center overseeing projects in their medical robotics, prosthetics and advanced human performance portfolios. He is currently an adjunct faculty in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland and working in the Robotic Demonstration and Test Facility at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

Presentation:
Introduction to Robotic Satellite Servicing

Introduction to Robotic Satellite Servicing


Craig Carignan
University of Maryland
NASA SSCO

Abstract:

Introduction to Robotic Satellite Servicing.

Wendell H. Chun


Contact:
Wendell H Chun
University of Denver
Denver, CO 80126

Biography:
Wendell Chun has 33 years of experience with Lockheed Martin Space Company in Denver, Colorado, performing a wide and diverse range of engineering disciplines from spacecraft to robotics. He was an Adjunct Professor of Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines (1999-2002, 2010) and is currently on the faculty at the University of Denver (2003-present), teaching both undergraduate and graduate classes in robotics and design. He was under contract to McGraw Hill Higher Education Publishers for a graduate textbook entitled: Robot Basics. Wendell Chun has been a consultant to the US government (e.g. NASA HQ, National Science Foundation), Academia (e.g. John Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab), large businesses (e.g. SAIC for Metal Storm), and small businesses (e.g. Omnitech Robotics, Smart Motion Robotics). He is a technologist and a systems engineer (integrating hardware/software), specializing in robotics and automation. He was co-chairman and editor of the SPIE Mobile Robots Conference (1987-1994) with Prof. Wolfe, and a Board of Trustee for the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (1996-1999). Working in robotics for over 25 years, he has been a member of the following world-leading robot research and development programs at Lockheed Martin: Autonomous Land Vehicle, Intelligent Task Automation, Unmanned Ground Vehicle Demo II, Automated Highway System, Flight Telerobotic Servicer, and the Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicle. Wendell Chun was responsible for Vehicle Systems Management, the software that operates the NASA Orion spacecraft currently in development. He consulted to NASA GSFC on satellite servicing and is developing robotic workcells using commercial manipulators in the agricultural field.

Presentation:
----

Giacomo Marani


Contact:
West Virginia University RC
WVRTC - NASA SSCO
1000 Galliher Dr.
26554 Fairmont, WV
+1 (304) 333-6071
www: http://gmarani.org
Email:

Biography:
Giacomo Marani was born in Italy. He received the "Laurea" degree in Electronic Engineering and the PhD degree in Robotics and Automation from the University of Pisa, Italy, in 1997 and 2000 respectively. In the past decade he has been with the University of Hawaii at Manoa, where he served as acting Principal Investigator and project coordinator of the SAUVIM project (Development of a Semi-Autonomous Underwater Vehicle for Intervention Missions), heading the technical coordination of the SAUVIM project partners.
He now serves as lead researcher at the WV Robotic Technology Center for the NASA GSFC - Space Servicing Capabilities Office, with focus on developments of sensor systems for the future NASA mission of robotics satellite servicing.
He is chair of the IEEE Marine Robotics Technical Committee and with the editorial board of the journal of Intelligent Service Robotics.
His primary interests are focused on the development of algorithms for autonomous robotic intervention, including simulation of mechanical systems, sensor fusion, environment interaction with computer vision, real-time programming and advanced solutions for remote operation.

Presentation:
Advances in Autonomous Underwater Intervention

Advances in Autonomous Underwater Intervention


Dr. Giacomo Marani
West Virginia University RC

Abstract:

This presentation will survey robotic systems developed for autonomous underwater intervention. Underwater systems for intervention have many similarities with space servicing concepts. The latest underwater mission of the ONR funded SAUVIM i-AUV is here presented as an example of underwater autonomous manipulation task.

David L. Akin


Contact:
Dr. David Akin
University of Maryland
Associate Professor/Space Systems Laboratory Director
Room 2100D Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility
dakin@ssl.umd.edu
(301) 405-1138

Biography:
David L. Akin, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and the Director of the Space Systems Laboratory at the University of Maryland. He has 30 years of experience in both extravehicular space operations and space robotics, and he has been the PI on several NASA robotic programs, a DARPA project for modular dexterous robots, and a NSF project to develop an autonomous underwater robot. He has written over 50 papers on aerospace systems design, EVA, teleoperation, robotics, and space simulation, and he has taught many courses in aerospace design, systems engineering, robotics, and human-robot interaction as well as mentoring students in the GEMSTONE program. Dr. Akin has served a member of the NASA Space Science Advisory Committee and the Mars Science Laboratory Independent Review Team.

Presentation:
From Free-Flyers to Dexterous Manipulators: Simulation of On-Orbit Servicing Tasks in Neutral Buoyancy

From Free-Flyers to Dexterous Manipulators: Simulation of On-Orbit Servicing Tasks in Neutral Buoyancy


Dr. Sean Dougherty
MDA-US, formerly Alliance Spacesystems LLC

Abstract:

This presentation will survey robotic systems developed by the University of Maryland Space Systems Laboratory for neutral buoyancy simulation of on-orbit robotic missions ranging from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing to repair and maintenance of satellites beyond LEO. The robotic systems developed for two proposed Ranger flight experiments will be reviewed, as well as extensive simulation of HST servicing tasks using an SPDM-equivalent Ranger system with two dexterous manipulators. The end-effector changeout mechanism and tools developed for these tasks will also be addressed.

Glen Henshaw


Contact:
Dr. Glen Henshaw
Naval Research Laboratory

Biography:
Dr. Henshaw received his bachelor's degree in computer science from Brigham Young University in 1993, master's degree in aerospace engineering and doctorate in 1997 and 2003 respectively, from the University of Maryland. He joined the Naval Research Laboratory in 2004, and he is currently the robotics lead for the NRL Front-end Robotics Enabling Near-term Demonstration (FREND) project to develop a state-of-the-art autonomous rendezvous and docking system for satellites not pre-designed for servicing. Henshaw also served as a principal investigator of the recently completed Low-design Impact Inspection Vehicle (LIIVe) program to develop a nano-satellite to safely circumnavigate and inspect disabled satellites at single-meter distances planned to be flown to the International Space Station in 2012. He is also the head of the Robotic Skin program to develop a "touch-sensitive" skin for use on robotic arms that may one day enable robots to actually manipulate objects by feel. His awards include the NRL Alan Berman Research Publication Awards 2009 and 2010 respectively, an NRL Special Act Award for his work on the FREND program in 2005, and a Technology Transfer Award in 2010.

Presentation:
Overview of the DARPA Phoenix Mission

Overview of the DARPA Phoenix Mission


Dr. Glen Henshaw
Naval Research Laboratory

Abstract:

DARPA’s Phoenix program is an ambitious attempt to develop and demonstrate technologies to cooperatively harvest and re-use valuable components from retired, nonworking satellites in GEO and demonstrate the ability to create new space systems at greatly reduced cost. Specifically, the Phoenix orbital demonstration mission’s primary goal is to reuse an existing RF aperture by attaching new hardware and electronics boxes called “satlets” to the aperture via a robotic servicing vehicle. The Phoenix orbital demonstration is slated for 2015; the mission prime integrator is the Naval Research Laboratory.
Obviously, robotically grappling a derelict spacecraft and attaching electronics boxes to a deployable space structure is a challenging task, and will require many techniques and technologies that have not previously been demonstrated in space. This talk focuses on potential mission profiles, system requirements and design of the robotic servicer, including grapple approaches, dexterous manipulation requirements, tool suite design, and teleoperation time delay mitigation techniques.

Mitsushige Oda


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Mitsushige Oda
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Biography:
Dr. Oda is developing space robotics for more than 25 years. He is a PI (Principal Investigator) of ETS-VII and REX-J. His ETS-VII team received the AIAA 2011 Space Automation and Robotics Award in 2011. He is currently a Leader of the Space Robotics while he is a visiting professor of the Graduate School of Tokyo Institute of Technology. From April 1st, 2012, He will become a professor of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, while he keeps a position in JAXA as a visiting researcher.

Presentation:
ETS-VII Follow-on Activities

ETS-VII, a precursor for the space station logistic support and the satellite servicing


Prof. Dr. Mitsushige Oda
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Abstract:

1. Introduction of JAXA’s ETS-VII satellite
ETS-VII satellite (Engineering Test Satellite #7 ) which consisted of twin satellite, the chaser and the target satellites was launched by NASDA (former JAXA) in 1997. The two satellites were disconnected in orbit and conducted autonomous rendezvous docking three times. Success of these rendezvous docking demonstrations is a solid base of JAXA’s space station logistics support vehicle named HTV or the H-II Transfer Vehicle.

2. ETS-VII’s satellite servicing experiments
The ETS-VII also demonstrated the satellite servicing. The ETS-VII chaser satellite had a 2m long, 6-dof robot manipulator which was tele-operated from the on-ground control station using NASA’s data relay satellite. This robot manipulator was used to conduct following tasks:
- Visual inspection of the onboard equipment
- Demonstration of in-orbit fuel (dummy fuel was used from health point of view)
- Handling (removal and re-installation) of an orbital replacement unit (ORU)
- Handling small equipment using an additional tool which can be attached to the robot manipulator.
- Autonomous target satellite tracking and capture.

3. Future space robots
Our human’s space exploration will be supported by robot like astronauts or an “Astrobot” JAXA is to conduct another experimental robot mission named REX-J (Robot Experiment on ISS/JEM) to demonstrate space robot’s locomotion capability on a large orbing facilities such as SSPS (Solar Power Satellite)


Sean Dougherty


Contact:
Dr. Sean Dougherty
MDA-US, formerly Alliance Spacesystems LLC

Biography:
Sean Dougherty has worked in the Aerospace and Robotics fields for over 15 years. His aerospace career began as an undergraduate at the University of Colorado, designing and launching sounding rocket payloads from Wallops Island, Virginia. He then spent several years at NASA/JSC where he trained astronauts for Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) as well as how to operate the various robotic systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. Sean then performed graduate research at Stanford University focused on the dynamics and controls of reentry vehicles with sharp leading edges. Since then Sean has worked at MDA were he has served a variety of roles including the project engineer for the FREND robotic arm designed to perform on-orbit servicing of unprepared satellites for DARPA. His early work at MDA involved a lunar rover design and testing of the manipulators for the Mars Exploration Rovers. Terrestrial projects have included the development of a vehicle mounted camera crane for the movie industry as well as gas and water pipe exploration and repair robots. Recently, Sean participated in NASA’s 2011 field season for the Haughton-Mars Project where he was the lead MDA field engineer helping to demonstrate the capacity for robotic arms to assist astronaut crewmembers conducting science and exploration.

Presentation:
The FREND Robotic Arm

The FREND Robotic Arm


Dr. Sean Dougherty
MDA-US, formerly Alliance Spacesystems LLC

Abstract:

The FREND robotic arm is a 7-DOF, spaceflight-rated system intended to service unprepared satellites in GEO. Both an engineering model and a flight unit have been developed and delivered to NRL as part of DARPA’s SUMO program. This presentation will discuss the FREND robotic arm and key system considerations for the design of spaceflight manipulator systems, specifically those for on-orbit servicing. The main design drivers and resulting capability will be discussed as well as the coupled nature of the manipulator to other mission elements and the mission design. The various modes of operation (tele-op, autonomous, and supervised autonomy) as well as the different levels of target understanding/preparedness and how those drive arm requirements will also be addressed.

Kazuya Yoshida


Contact:
Dr. Kazuya Yoshida
Professor, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering
Director, Center of Robotics for Extreme and Uncertain Environments
Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Tel/Fax +81-22-795-6992
E-mail:

Biography:
Professor Kazuya Yoshida received B. E., M. S. and Dr. Eng, degrees in Mechanical Engineering Science from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in 1984, 1986, and 1990, respectively. He served as Research Associate of Tokyo Institute of Technology from 1986 to 1994, and Visiting Scientist of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A. in 1994. From 1995 to 2003, he was appointed as Associate Professor and since 2003 he is Full Professor in Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Japan. He also serves as Director of Center of Robotics for Extreme and Uncertain Environments in Tohoku University since 2011. His research activities cover dynamics and control of space robotic systems ranging from orbital free-flying robots to planetary exploration rovers. His activities are extended to the development of university-based micro satellites and also the terrestrial applications of space technology, such as robotic remote exploration for search and rescue missions. His technical contribution is found in ETS-VII (orbital experiments of a free-flying space robot), HAYABUSA (an asteroid sample return probe), RISING/RISING-2 (50 kg microsatellites for science mission) and QUINCE (a mobile robot to cope with the Fukushima power plant incident,) for example. In addition, he has been contributing to space robotics education for international students at International Space University in Strasbourg, France (for Master of Space Studies) and various locations in the world (for Summer Study Programs). He serves as Visiting Lecturer since 1998, Adjunct Faculty since 2007, and (non resident) Faculty of International Space University since 2009. He also organizes Tohoku University Engineering Summer Program on Robotics since 2010. Member of IEEE since 1990, a member and a committee co-chair of the Robotics and Automation Society (RAS) Technical Committee (TC) on Space Robotics, since 2007.

Presentation:
Space Robotics TC Perspective

Space Robotics TC Perspective


Dr. Kazuya Yoshida
Director, Center of Robotics for Extreme and Uncertain Environments
Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

Abstract:

The Space Robotics Technical Committee of IEEE Robotics and Automation Society concerns both orbital robotics and planetary robotics, and robotic satellite servicing is an important application target of orbital robotics technology. Since 1980's there have been a number of studies, ground-based verification tests and orbital flight demonstrations, however, the robotic satellite servicing has not yet come into practical use. This presentation provides a brief overview of enabling technology for satellite servicing with highlighting what have been done in the past and what issues are left open for future research.

Robonaut 2 Status


Nicolaus Radford
Robonaut Deputy Project Manager
Dexterous Robotics Laboratory-Annex

Abstract:

Robonaut 2

Nicolaus A. Radford


Contact:
Nicolaus Radford
Robonaut Deputy Project Manager
Dexterous Robotics Laboratory-Annex
Office: 281-244-5076
E-mail:

Biography:
Nicolaus A. Radford currently works for National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in the Dexterous Robotics Laboratory. He serves as the Deputy Project Manager and Chief Electrical Engineer for NASA's Robonaut 2, an anthropomorphic humanoid robot. He is also the Principal Investigator for NASA in DARPA-funded advanced electric machine research for robotics. He also leads NASA efforts in exoskeleton research for crew exercise and mobility assistance. He specializes in inverter design for brushless DC motor control. He graduated with a B.S.E.E. ('00) and a M.S.E.E ('12) from Purdue University and is currently pursuing a PhD absentia with Dr. Steven Pekarek in Optimal Design of Variable Flux Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines at Purdue also.

Presentation:
Robonaut 2 Status

Alvar Saenz-Otero


Contact:
Dr. Alvar Saenz-Otero
MIT Space Systems Laboratory
E-mail:

Biography:
Dr. Saenz-Otero is currently a Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Associate Director of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory, and a consultant to Aurora Flight Sciences. He has been the MIT SPHERES Lead Scientist since June 2005. His tasks include the development of research activities for tests aboard the International Space Station and in ground facilities including the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. As the primary avionics engineer for the SPHERES program, Dr. Saenz-Otero developed both the hardware and software architectures for the satellites. His doctoral research included a thorough analysis of the utilization of the International Space Station for technology research. Dr. Saenz-Otero has taught several classes at MIT, including his own "prototyping avionics" class and as teaching staff in the capstone laboratory classes. Dr. Saenz-Otero holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, as well as B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Engineering, all from MIT.

Presentation:
Space Robotics TC Perspective

Maturation of AR&D algorithms with SPHERES


Alvar Saenz-Otero
MIT Space Systems Laboratory

Abstract:

This talk will present the sequence of incremental steps in the development of AR&D algorithms using the SPHERES Facility in the ground and aboard the International Space Station. SPHERES provides up to three satellites which free float aboard the ISS and move in 2D on air carriages in Flat Floor facilities on the ground. Using this hardware the SPHERES team has developed multiple types of algorithms for AR&D starting in 2006. The presentation will show results of each incremental step:
- Docking algorithms aboard the ISS (6 DOF) with docking targets and autonomous path planning
- Control of structures before, during, and after docking:
-- Assembly of "rigid" structures at the MSFC Flat Floor
-- Assembly of flexible structures at the MIT SSL Flat Floor
-- Rigid multi-body control aboard the ISS
- Research of "inspection" maneuvers with camera systems
-- Determination of coverage
-- Fusion of vision and IMU sensors
-- Initial development of vision-based navigation algorithms
The talk will conclude with a description of the future plans for development of algorithms and demonstrations both on the ground and aboard the ISS.

John Ringelberg


Contact:
Dr. John Ringelberg
Lockheed Martin
E-mail:

Biography:
John Ringelberg is a Senior Staff Engineer with Lockheed Martin in Denver, Colorado, in the Human Space Flight (HSF) Advanced Programs group. He currently manages a team performing Internal Research and Development (IRAD) activities, including technology development, maturation and test of AR&D capabilities. John has over 23 years experience in space systems test and development. He received his Bachelors Degree from the University of Florida and a Masters Degree from the University of Denver.

Presentation:
Supervisory Control for Servicing AR&D

Supervisory Control for Servicing AR&D


John Ringelberg
Lockheed Martin

Abstract:

Satellite servicing is enabled by the capability to perform automated/autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D), which requires an integrated and coupled system of sensors, software and mechanisms. The inclusion of a human supervisory and assistance interface can reduce risks associated with a fully autonomous approach and capture operation. This presentation addresses the high risk aspects of close proximity approach and capture of an unmanned craft that is most likely not configured with navigation aids or a capture interface, and presents a methodology toward accomplishing approach and capture for satellite servicing.

Roberto Lampariello


Contact:
Roberto Lampariello
Robotics and Mechatronics Center (DLR)
E-mail:

Biography:
Mr. Lampariello received his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from Southampton University in 1990, master’s degree in aeroplane aerodynamics from Cranfield University in 1991 and a specialization degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in 1998. He is since then employed as a researcher with the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the DLR in Germany, where he works in the fields of dynamics and control of free-flying space robots and in robot motion planning. He was actively involved in the joint JAXA-DLR experiments (GETEX) performed on the ETS-VII robotic satellite in 1998. He since then has been serving as a principal investigator in DLR programs (TECSAS, DEOS) for a demonstration mission of the grasping and deorbiting of a non-cooperative tumbling target. He is project leader of the research project FORROST, which aims at developing methodologies for robotic on-orbit technologies. His current activities also involve addressing motion planning tasks for the DLR Biped and Light-Weight Robot, as well as docking simulations with the EPOS facility (DLR GSOC). Since 2012 he is lecturer at the Chair for Aerospace Engineering of the Technical University in Munich, for a course in orbital and robotic dynamics and control.

Presentation:
Towards semi-autonomous grasping of a non-cooperative target

Towards semi-autonomous grasping of a non-cooperative target


Roberto Lampariello
Robotic and Mechatronic Center (DLR)

Abstract:

In this talk a short overview on some of the research activities at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center (DLR) in the development of on-orbit robotic technologies for satellite servicing is given. The task of grasping a non-cooperative tumbling target satellite by means of a free-floating robot is addressed. In order to support a semi-autonomous operational mode, the task is solved as a motion planning problem, such that feasible trajectories are made available for a tracking controller. The challenges and benefits of this approach are highlighted and examples are given in simulation for typical orbital scenarios. The talk ends with an outlook on the close future verification of this approach on a new experimental facility.

Jordi Artigas Esclusa


Contact:
Dipl.-Ing. Jordi Artigas-Esclusa
DLR - German Aerospace Center
http://www.dlr.de
Robotics and Mechatronics Center
D-82230, Wessling, Germany
http://www.robotic.dlr.de/Jordi.Artigas
E-mail:

Biography:
[...]

Presentation:
Telerobotics enabling On-Orbit Servicing – A DLR perspective

Telerobotics enabling On-Orbit Servicing – A DLR perspective


Dipl.-Ing. Jordi Artigas-Esclusa
DLR - German Aerospace Center

Abstract:

Telerobotics is a key element in robotics for providing services to on-orbit spacecrafts and satellites, for reducing space debris and for enabling planetary exploration. Such a technology will possibly replace some astronautic operations and will open new applications which, until present, were out of the scope due to technological limitations. In recent years a number of significant steps have already been undertaken laying the ground toward a space qualified robotic technology. There are however still open issues until daily-life application. In this talk a set of requirements identified by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) will be exposed. Different facets of space telerobotics will be discussed, including the direct control of the haptic channel with force feedback using space links; The shared control which combines autonomous robotic tasks and direct telemanipulation; And supervisory control strategies which cope with large time delays by sending skills and gross commands to distant locations with restricted communication links. Last but not least, a glance on the DLR space missions related to telerobotics will be presented, including, among others, ROTEX (Robot Technology Experiment) and ROKVISS (Robotic Component Verification on the ISS) missions and the planned German On-Orbit Servicing DEOS mission.

Kevin L. Miller


Contact:
Kevin L. Miller
Ball Aerospace
E-mail:

Biography:
Mr. Miller is a Business Development and Advanced Systems Manager at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., where he leads strategic planning, technology maturation, program development and design activities, with emphasis on NASA’s human spaceflight and advanced technology programs in the Civil and Operational Space business unit. Mr. Miller has 29 years of experience in space systems design and analysis. In addition to human spaceflight programs such as shuttle and space station, his experience includes a broad range of autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic systems development, including planetary landers and rovers, teleoperated manipulator systems and autonomous relative navigation systems. Mr. Miller began his career in payload integration and mission operations for the shuttle program and has performed in program management, systems and mechanical engineering and management roles for a broad range of programs, including human spaceflight, interplanetary robotic programs, and other civil and defense space systems. He has had progressive responsibilities on a range of space programs, and his responsibilities have addressed all phases of development, including technology research through operational flight systems. Mr. Miller received a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a Master of Science in Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

Presentation:
Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking and Relative Navigation Systems for Robotic Servicing

Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking and Relative Navigation Systems for Robotic Servicing


Kevin L. Miller
Ball Aerospace

Abstract:

One of the enabling functional capabilities for robotic space servicing of satellites is Relative Navigation (RelNav), and especially Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). AR&D capabilities have been used in space, airborne and other environments for many years, but due to limitations in a priori knowledge, variability in target vehicle conditions and approach, uncertainty in ConOps and lighting conditions, and other considerations, satellite servicing demands more robust capabilities that may be executed in more stressing environments than previously implemented. In addition, practical constraints also warrant significant reductions in weight and power for AR&D versus prior solutions.
This presentation describes advances in the state of the art for sensors and navigation processing developed in anticipation of future satellite servicing missions. This presentation provides progress and performance results associated with relative navigation via STORRM (Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation) which was flown in 2011 on STS-134, as well as other RelNav technology advancement efforts in industry and government. Advances in compact, realtime processing architectures and algorithms, high performance camera technology, and advances in flash LIDAR and systems engineering are provided.

Peter Kazanzides


Contact:
Peter Kazanzides
Johns Hopkins University
E-mail:

Biography:
Peter Kazanzides received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Brown University in 1988. His dissertation focused on force control and multi-processor systems for robotics. He began work on surgical robotics in March 1989 as a postdoctoral researcher at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. Dr. Kazanzides co-founded Integrated Surgical Systems (ISS) in November 1990 to commercialize the robotic hip replacement research performed at IBM and the University of California, Davis. As Director of Robotics and Software, he was responsible for the design, implementation, validation and support of the ROBODOC System, which has been used for more than 20,000 hip and knee replacement surgeries. Dr. Kazanzides joined the Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology (CISST ERC) in December 2002 and currently holds an appointment as an Associate Research Professor of Computer Science at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU). He is the Director of the Sensing, Manipulation, and Real-Time Systems (SMARTS) lab and a member of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics (LCSR) at JHU. His current research activities are in computer-integrated surgery and satellite servicing, which share common themes of human/machine interfaces to keep the human in the loop, real-time sensing to account for uncertainty, and system engineering to enable deployment in the real world.

Presentation:
Enabling Technologies for Remote Robotic Telemanipulation with Time Delay

Enabling Technologies for Remote Robotic Telemanipulation with Time Delay


Peter Kazanzides
Johns Hopkins University

Abstract:

This talk will present an augmented reality (AR) telerobotic master console to support satellite servicing tasks under significant time delay. The master console is based on a da Vinci surgical robot, and leverages our research in AR overlays and virtual fixtures. We demonstrate that virtual fixtures, defined via the AR interface, enable efficient cutting of the satellite's MLI blanket flap, even with a time delay of several seconds.

Brian Roberts


Contact:
Brian Roberts
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
WWW: http://brian.spacelist.org/
email:

Biography:
Brian Roberts is the ground demonstration and test manager in the Space Servicing Capabilities Office (http://ssco.gsfc.nasa.gov/) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. His team is developing the capability to simulate contact dynamics of a robotic system interacting with a satellite and using industrial robotic platforms to simulate satellite motion for the testing and evaluation of navigation systems. Before coming to Goddard, Brian spent 6 years as a research engineer at the University of Maryland as part of a team that developed and tested various space, undersea, and exoskeleton robotic systems.
Brian earned a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio and completed a Master of Science in the same field at the University of Maryland.

Presentation:
Robotics Servicing Challenges

Robotics Servicing Challenges


Brian Roberts
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Abstract:

This presentation will review the challenges in simulating on-orbit robotic satellite servicing on the ground at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These challenges range from using industrial robots to simulate space robot dynamics to testing refueling operations that are impacted greatly by microgravity. NASA's ongoing Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM) launched on the last space shuttle will be highlighted along with the specialized robotic tools built for the mission. Mission support such as communications, video, and operator interfaces will also be discussed.